Maine House of Representatives - Wikipedia

Maine House of Representatives
Maine State Legislature
Coat of arms or logo
Type
Type
Term limits
4 Terms (8 years)
History
New session started
December 7, 2022
Leadership
(D)
since December 7, 2022
Majority Leader
(D)
since December 7, 2022
Minority Leader
(R)
since December 7, 2022
Structure
Seats151 (and 3 non-voting)
Maine House voting December 7, 2022.svg
Political groups
Majority
  •   Democratic (82)

Minority

Other

Vacant

  •   Vacant (2 non-voting[a])
MaineHouse2022non-voting.svg
Length of term
2 years
AuthorityArticle IV, Part First, Maine Constitution
SalarySession 1: $13,526/year
Session 2: $9,661/year + per diem
Elections
Last election
November 8, 2022
(151 seats)
Next election
November 5, 2024
(151 seats)
RedistrictingLegislative Control
Meeting place
House of Representatives Chamber
Maine State House
Augusta, Maine
Maine House of Representatives 2014.jpg
Website
Maine House of Representatives

The Maine House of Representatives is the lower house of the Maine Legislature. The House consists of 151 voting members and three nonvoting members. The voting members represent an equal number of districts across the state and are elected via plurality voting. The nonvoting members represent three of Maine's Native American tribes, though two tribes have declined to send representatives. Each voting member of the House represents around 9,000 citizens of the state. Because it is a part-time position, members of the Maine House of Representatives usually have outside employment as well. Members are limited to four consecutive terms of two years each, but may run again after two years.

The House meets at the Maine State House in Augusta.

Leadership of the House[edit]

The Speaker of the House presides over the House of Representatives. The Speaker is elected by the majority party caucus followed by confirmation of the full House through the passage of a House Resolution. In addition to presiding over the body, the Speaker is also the chief leadership position, and controls the flow of legislation and committee assignments. Other House leaders, such as the majority and minority leaders, are elected by their respective party caucuses relative to their party's strength in the chamber.

Composition of the 131st (2022-2024) Maine House of Representatives[edit]

Affiliation Party
(Shading indicates majority caucus)
Total
Democratic Republican Green Ind. Independ. Nonpart. Vacant
Begin 126th Legislature (Dec. 2012) 89 58 0 4 151 0
End 126th Legislature 57 150 1
Begin 127th Legislature (Dec. 2014) 79 68 0 4 151 0
End 127th Legislature 78 69
Begin 128th Legislature (Dec. 2016) 77 72 0 2 151 0
End 128th Legislature 73 70 1 6 150 1
Begin 129th Legislature (Dec. 2018)[b] 89 57 0 5 151 0
End 129th Legislature 87 56 6 149 2
Begin 130th Legislature (Dec. 2020) 80 67 0 4 151 0
End 130th Legislature 76 63 3 142 9
Begin 131st Legislature (Dec. 2022) 82 67 0 2 151 0
Latest voting share 54.3% 44.4% 0% 1.3%
Non-voting members 1 1 2

Nonvoting members of the House[edit]

The three nonvoting members within the House represent the Wabanaki or Dawnland nations of the Penobscot, the Passamaquoddy, and the Maliseet. The special Representatives can sponsor legislation relating specifically to the Tribes or in relation to Tribal - State land claims, as well as co-sponsor any other legislation brought before the House, but do not cast a legislative vote due to their unique tribal status representing their tribal members only. The Penobscot, Passamaquoddy and Maliseet tribal representatives are also entitled to sit as members of joint standing committees during hearings and deliberations, where they do cast votes, which can be very important with respect to specific legislative proposals.

Starting with the second session of the 125th Legislature, the Houlton Band of Maliseets was given a legislative seat in the House of Representatives. The first elected occupant of the seat is Henry John Bear. After being sworn in by Governor Paul LePage, Bear stated he would introduce legislation to give the Micmac people of Maine a nonvoting seat.[1]

The Passamaquoddy and Penobscots announced at a State House rally on May 26, 2015 that they would withdraw their representatives from the Legislature, citing disputes over tribal fishing rights, jurisdictional issues, and a lack of respect for tribal sovereignty. They further cited an executive order by Governor Paul LePage that rescinded a prior order requiring consultation with the tribes on state issues that affected them as a reason for their decision. Subsequently, Matthew Dana II of the Passamaquoddy and Wayne Mitchell of the Penobscot left the legislature leaving Henry John Bear of the Maliseet the only non-voting tribal representative. In response, Speaker Eves said that the tribal representatives are always welcome in the House. Matthew Dana II returned to the House from the Passamaquoddy Tribe in the 2016 elections.[2]

The Maliseets chose not to send a Representative to the 129th Legislature, elected in 2018. As of December 2022, the Maliseets and the Penobscots haven't returned to the House, leaving just the Passamaquoddy Representative, presently Aaron Dana.[3]

Independents and other parties[edit]

Due to the independent political tradition in the state, the Maine House of Representatives has been an entry ground for several of the state's prominent Independent politicians. From 2002 to 2006, Representative John Eder of Portland (District 118), belonging to the Maine Green Independent Party, served in the Legislature, the highest elected Green politician in U.S. politics at that time. Eder secured recognition as a one-member Green Party caucus in the House, receiving a dedicated staff person, which is unusual for individual legislators in the Maine House. In the 2006 elections, Eder lost his seat to a Democratic challenger.

On September 21, 2017, Ralph Chapman, previously registered as an independent, switched his registration to the Maine Green Independent Party, the first time in over a decade that the Maine Green Independent Party was represented at the state level.[4]

Officers[edit]

Position Name[5] Party Hometown
Speaker of the House Democratic
Majority Leader Democratic
Majority Whip Democratic
Minority Leader Republican
Minority Whip Republican

Members of the Maine House of Representatives[edit]

Districts are currently numbered starting with 1 from north to south. This is often reversed after each decennial redistricting, and it was reversed in the redistricting which occurred in 2021 and which went into effect beginning with the 2022 primary and general elections. The previous district lines, which were drawn in 2013 and were first used in the 2014 primary and general elections, were only in effect for 8 years rather than the usual 10 as Maine adjusted its legislative redistricting cycle to conform with most other states.

↑ denotes that the Representative first won in a special election

District Representative[5] Party Residence First elected Term-limited
1
2 ed
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
75
76
77
78
79
80
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
99
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
119
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
128
129
130
131
132
133
134
135
136
137
138
139
140
141
142
143
144
145
146
147
148
149
150
151

Non-voting members[edit]

Representing Representative Party Residence First elected Term-limited
Passamaquoddy Tribe Aaron M. Dana Nptsn Princeton 2022 ?
Houlton Band of Maliseet Indians Vacant
Penobscot Nation Vacant

Past composition of the House of Representatives[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The Houlton Band of Maliseets and Penobscot Nation have both withdrawn their non-voting Representatives to the Maine House of Representatives.
  2. ^ Includes a Rep.-elect who declined to take the oath of office.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Bayly, Julia (January 26, 2012). "Houlton Maliseet, first elected tribal representative to Maine House, looking forward to session". Bangor Daily News.
  2. ^ Moretto, Mario (May 26, 2015). "Passamaquoddy, Penobscot tribes withdraw from Maine Legislature". Bangor Daily News.
  3. ^ "Tribal Representatives to the Maine Legislature, 1823 - | Maine State Legislature". legislature.maine.gov.
  4. ^ "Lawmaker's party switch gives Greens a seat in the Maine House". 22 September 2017.
  5. ^ a b "Maine House of Representatives". legislature.maine.gov.

External links[edit]